spookygoo:

I was talking about why Chef Gordon Ramsay was so angry all the time, and explained that he originally wanted to be a professional soccer player but suffered a really bad knee injury and couldn’t play anymore, so he poured himself into cooking and culinary arts to help with his anger issues, but his abusive alcoholic father disapproved of his cooking and died before ever tasting any of it and I realized that Gordon Ramsay has the most anime backstory ever.

(via timkarinn)

Tags: holy shit

melthedestroyer:

coffeebuddha:

fujisalci:

i write sins not shopping receipts

Oh,  Well imagine,  As I’m pacing the aisles in a small corner store, And I can’t help but to hear,  No, I can’t help but to hear an exchanging of words: “What a beautiful melon! What a beautiful melon!” says a patron to a stocker. “And yes, but what a shame, what a shame we’re not getting in any more.”

I CHIME WITH HAVEN’T YOU PEOPLE EVER HEARD OF
STOCKING THE GODDAMN STORE, NO

melthedestroyer:

coffeebuddha:

fujisalci:

i write sins not shopping receipts

Oh,
Well imagine,
As I’m pacing the aisles in a small corner store,
And I can’t help but to hear,
No, I can’t help but to hear an exchanging of words:
“What a beautiful melon! What a beautiful melon!” says a patron to a stocker.
“And yes, but what a shame, what a shame we’re not getting in any more.”

I CHIME WITH HAVEN’T YOU PEOPLE EVER HEARD OF

STOCKING THE GODDAMN STORE, NO

(Source: pinkmanjesse, via birdstiality)

superblys:

bucky—soldier:

so I am in the theater to see “Guardians of the Galaxy” and they start playing Dreamwork’s “Rise of the Guardians”…and everyone is laughing thinking this is a hilarious joke, but in actuality someone LEGITIMATELY mixed the two movies up, so long story short I am not seeing Guardians tonight.

oh my god I AM LAUGHING SO HARD I TOLD YOU GUYS TO WAIT FOR ME

sixpenceee:

The amount of messages telling me to watch Blackwater Gospel. 
It is a dark, creepy animation about an angry priest who rages at a man that doesn’t believe what he believes. 
The analogy to the real world is astounding. 
This animation is violent however. Viewer discretion is advised. 
WATCH HERE
LAST RECOMMENDATION: ZERO

sixpenceee:

The amount of messages telling me to watch Blackwater Gospel. 

It is a dark, creepy animation about an angry priest who rages at a man that doesn’t believe what he believes. 

The analogy to the real world is astounding. 

This animation is violent however. Viewer discretion is advised. 

WATCH HERE

LAST RECOMMENDATION: ZERO

(via vitious)

corinaisprettycool:

she looks like she’s gonna kill the h8rz

(Source: bemynightingale, via rifa)

How to be a real man:

karkatvantasfan:

-Be as swift as a coursing river
-With all the force of a great typhoon
-With all the strength of a raging fire
-Mysterious as the dark side of the moon

devildoll:

helenish:

dailytylerhoechlin:

Tyler Hoechlin for August Man Malaysia August 2014 issue.(x)

THIS PHOTOSET MAKES T. HOECHLIN LOOK LIKE A REALLY, REALLY, REALLY, REALLY, REALLY, REALLY, REALLY EXPENSIVE AND PERFECT SEX ROBOT. Sorry, did I say sex robot? I meant robot. Just. Like a robot you buy to have sex with. SHIT. I did it again.

ANYHOW, I can’t afford this robot, you can’t afford this robot, NO ONE CAN AFFORD THIS ROBOT, but I am really glad it exists, this labor of love, this botticelli of sex robots, a robot that can open AND close its eyes and turn its head to at least 3 different angles, a technological marvel.

image

tonyespera:

lusilly:

gobigorgoextinct:

Jaeger with a sticker on its rear that says ‘Jesus is my co-pilot’

#Headcanon: its Matador Fury from Mexico #piloted by Jesus and Carlos 

 (via nathanielfick)

(via charcoalmink)

crazyguitarcruco:

DOOO WEEEEEEEEE OOOOOOOO

(Source: wenchyfloozymoo, via sailorbirdie)

fightingforanimals:

Veronika Scott was a fashion student at the College for Creative Studies in Detroit when her teacher, Stephen Schock, challenged her class to create a product that filled a need, rather than satisfying or creating a fad. Veronika’s design was a coat for homeless people that could transform into a sleeping bag, since in her city, she says, “you are constantly faced with the homeless epidemic.” Not only did her design win a International Design Excellence Award from the Industrial Designers Society of America, it’s become the core of Veronika’s nonprofit organization, The Empowerment Plan, which hires people from homeless shelters and transition homes to help her make the coats. Now, three years later, the 24-year-old social entrepreneur expects that her team of 15 seamstresses will produce over 6,000 coats in 2014 — all of which will be distributed free of charge to people living on the streets. Veronika originally designed the coats seeking input from people at a homeless shelter. After receiving feedback from people who used the prototype over a Detroit winter, she refined the design to create her final version which, in addition to being a waterproof and windproof coat and sleeping bag, also transforms into an over-the-shoulder bag with storage in the arm sockets. When she started out, Veronika states,

“Everybody told me that my business was going to fail — not because of who I was giving my product to but because of who I was hiring. They said that these homeless women will never make more than a peanut butter and jelly sandwich — you cannot rely on them for anything. And I know my ladies enjoy proving everybody wrong.” 

And, their impact is growing — according to CNN, which recently honored Veronika as one of their 10 Visionary Women of 2014, “The Empowerment Plan expects to launch a ‘buy one, give one’ program that will make it sustainable beyond the donations and sponsorships that keep it running now. Hunters and backpackers who’ve asked to buy the coat will be able to do so, and the Empowerment Plan will still create coats for homeless people who need them.”Veronika is also excited to show other clothing producers that local manufacturing is possible: “I think we’re going to show a lot of people: you think it’s outdated to do manufacturing in your neighborhood, but I think it’s something that we have to do in the future, where it’s sustainable, where you invest in people, where they’re not interchangeable parts.”You can read more about Veronika’s organization on CNN, or watch a short video about her work here.To learn more about The Empowerment Plan or how you can support their work, visit http://www.empowermentplan.org/For a wonderful book about women’s great inventions throughout history, check out “Girls Think of Everything” for readers 8 to 13.For those in the US who would like to support efforts to end homelessness and help the over 600,000 people who experience homelessness on any given night, visit the National Alliance to End Homelessness athttp://www.naeh.org/ or to find a local homeless shelter to support in your area, visit http://www.homelessshelterdirectory.org/

fightingforanimals:

Veronika Scott was a fashion student at the College for Creative Studies in Detroit when her teacher, Stephen Schock, challenged her class to create a product that filled a need, rather than satisfying or creating a fad. Veronika’s design was a coat for homeless people that could transform into a sleeping bag, since in her city, she says, “you are constantly faced with the homeless epidemic.” 

Not only did her design win a International Design Excellence Award from the Industrial Designers Society of America, it’s become the core of Veronika’s nonprofit organization, The Empowerment Plan, which hires people from homeless shelters and transition homes to help her make the coats. Now, three years later, the 24-year-old social entrepreneur expects that her team of 15 seamstresses will produce over 6,000 coats in 2014 — all of which will be distributed free of charge to people living on the streets. 

Veronika originally designed the coats seeking input from people at a homeless shelter. After receiving feedback from people who used the prototype over a Detroit winter, she refined the design to create her final version which, in addition to being a waterproof and windproof coat and sleeping bag, also transforms into an over-the-shoulder bag with storage in the arm sockets. 

When she started out, Veronika states,

“Everybody told me that my business was going to fail — not because of who I was giving my product to but because of who I was hiring. They said that these homeless women will never make more than a peanut butter and jelly sandwich — you cannot rely on them for anything. And I know my ladies enjoy proving everybody wrong.” 

And, their impact is growing — according to CNN, which recently honored Veronika as one of their 10 Visionary Women of 2014, “The Empowerment Plan expects to launch a ‘buy one, give one’ program that will make it sustainable beyond the donations and sponsorships that keep it running now. Hunters and backpackers who’ve asked to buy the coat will be able to do so, and the Empowerment Plan will still create coats for homeless people who need them.”

Veronika is also excited to show other clothing producers that local manufacturing is possible: “I think we’re going to show a lot of people: you think it’s outdated to do manufacturing in your neighborhood, but I think it’s something that we have to do in the future, where it’s sustainable, where you invest in people, where they’re not interchangeable parts.”

You can read more about Veronika’s organization on CNN, or watch a short video about her work here.

To learn more about The Empowerment Plan or how you can support their work, visit http://www.empowermentplan.org/

For a wonderful book about women’s great inventions throughout history, check out “Girls Think of Everything” for readers 8 to 13.

For those in the US who would like to support efforts to end homelessness and help the over 600,000 people who experience homelessness on any given night, visit the National Alliance to End Homelessness athttp://www.naeh.org/ or to find a local homeless shelter to support in your area, visit http://www.homelessshelterdirectory.org/

(via motherfuckingnazgul)